This.

Just read an excellent article over on AlterNet, discussing what impact Bill Gates’ big speech of a few days ago might have. Gates just announced that he’s putting his massive resources and personal clout behind the target of getting to zero carbon emissions by 2050. Globally. Zero.

From the AlterNet article:

Gates spoke about his commitment to using his massive philanthropic resources (the Gates Foundation is the world’s largest) to make life better for people through public health and poverty alleviation (“vaccines and seeds” as he put it). Then he said something he’s never said before: that is it because he’s committed to improving life for the world’s vulnerable people that he now believes that climate change is the most important challenge on the planet.

Even more importantly, he acknowledged the only sensible goal, when it comes to climate emissions, is to eliminate them: we should be aiming for a civilization that produces no net emissions, and we should be aiming to live in that civilization here in the developed world by 2050.

I don’t think most of us even let ourselves dream about that kind of goal. Successes in the environmental movement, especially at the global level, are so depressingly few and far between that we have a tendency to define our goals very narrowly, to try to insulate ourselves a little from the cascade of disaster that would otherwise bury us. I can imagine and work towards a bike lane on Ste-Catherine Street. That’s a goal I can see reaching. I don’t think I could honestly focus on the goal of a zero-carbon-emissions world without falling into despair.

Maybe that’s just me. Maybe I give up too easily. But I think a lot of us would be daunted by this scale of work; because we don’t normally work on that scale. And the people who do work on a global scale readily, the CEOs of international corporations and the politicians of nation-states and the generally super-rich, they aren’t thinking this way. (I’m going to define “they” in a very reductionist way here as “anybody who has access to their very own airplane”.)

That’s why everyone’s buzzing so much about this: because Gates isn’t David Suzuki, he isn’t George Monbiot; he’s one of them. And now we’ve got one of them on our side.

Is his goal realistic? I don’t know. Is he, even with all the resources of his foundation, going to be able to have much of an impact here? Maybe, maybe not. But it sure is one heck of a morale boost that he’s decided to try.

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3 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by jackinthegreen on April 7, 2010 at 2:26 pm

    I, and many others, are not so sanguine about Bill’s new tree-huggin persona. If you look at the fine print, regarding his goals and the current practices of his foundation, he’s strongly pro – geoengineering..nukes..GMOs.. the list goes on. To me, it’s the windows bloatware approach 2 sustainability, and like windows probably more likely to lead to a crash than a solution.

    There’s nothing moral about Bill’s economy.

    Reply

    • Posted by moraleconomy on April 8, 2010 at 7:50 pm

      Granted, his approach has got a lot of problems, but we’re headed for a crash anyway the way things are going; I’d rather have people in that bracket at least trying to work on solutions, even if they’re not the ones I’d choose myself.

      Reply

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Green Vision. Green Vision said: This.: Just read an excellent article over on AlterNet, discussing what impact Bill Gates’ big speech http://bit.ly/cmh5wA […]

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